The Frank and Jane Gabor West Virginia Folklife Center

The Frank and Jane Gabor West Virginia Folklife Center is dedicated to the identification, preservation, and perpetuation of our region's rich cultural heritage, through academic studies, educational programs, festivals and performances, and publications. The WV Folklife Center is part of the College of Liberal Arts.

Mountain Mother Goose is a collection of jingles, jangles, rhymes, riddles, games, and lesson stories chanted and sung on the playgrounds of Central Appalachia, recited in one-room schools, and echoed in backyards and schoolyards throughout the small villages and farms that dotted the hills and valleys of West Virginia. Stretching through most of the 20th Century, this collection of melodies traces the regional attitudes and traditions of American children at play. As early progressive educators and folklorists, Dr. Walter Barnes and Dr. Ruth Ann Musick painstakingly gathered a rich harvest of child lore.

FSUNow Stories

Friday, March 24, 2017

Kestrel: A Journal of Literature and Art and the Fairmont State University Department of Language and Literature will host a two-day Celebration of Issue 36 featuring nine Kestrel writers on March 31 and April 1.

Events will be located in Jaynes Hall and the Frank and Jane Gabor West Virginia Folklife Center on the FSU campus and at the community coffeehouse, Joe ‘n Throw, 323 ½ Adams St., Fairmont.

On Friday, March 31, three day-time events are free and open to the public:

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Tuesday, February 28, 2017

The Frank and Jane Gabor West Virginia Folklife Center at Fairmont State University presented two awards at the Midwinter Gathering for the Friends of the Folklife Center on Friday, Feb. 24.

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Monday, November 07, 2016

A series of events will honor Fairmont native and “Forgotten Hero” James Show Maddox.

“This is a really inspirational story of leadership and survival and is an account of a World War II incident involving a young U.S. Navy ensign who grew up on Pittsburgh Avenue in Fairmont,” said local historian M. Raymond Alvarez, who became fascinated by Maddox’s story and has written a 50-page local history publication titled “Forgotten Hero.”

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